Career Center

Effective Date: 07/01/2009
Last Updated: 04/22/2009

The University of Georgia Career Center is a comprehensive career planning and employment center located on the second floor of Clark Howell Hall. The Career Center provides a complete range of services and materials in the areas of career development, graduate & professional school preparation, experiential education, and employer relations and recruiting.

Career Center Role within the University Community
POLICY: 1
Effective Date: 06/24/2009
Last Updated: 04/22/2009

The University of Georgia Career Center is the sole provider (except for MBA and Law students) of centralized career services to undergraduate, graduate students, and alumni at The University of Georgia.  Career Center staff work collaboratively with faculty and staff of all departments to enhance the career success of University of Georgia students/alumni.  The UGA Career Center acknowledges that a small number of career programs exist at some level at several colleges within the university.  Policies for faculty and staff members outside the UGA Career Center are included in this document and entitled "Faculty/Staff: Here's Your Role in the Process as it Relates to Career Services, Employers, and Students/Alumni."  When there are conflicts and potential problems, the policies of The University of Georgia Career Center shall take precedence

Career services and employment professionals are involved in an important process-helping students/alumni choose and attain personally rewarding careers, and helping employers develop effective college relations programs which contribute to effective candidate selections for their organizations. The impact of this process upon individuals and organizations requires commitment by practitioners to principles for professional conduct. 

Career services and employment professionals are partners in the recruiting process with a common goal of achieving the best match between the individual student and the employing organization.  This partnership effort traditionally involves students.  However, when additional parties (alumni, community members, faculty, staff) are involved, the UGA Career Center asserts a necessary and central role in employer relationships to ensure that the recruiting process falls within the policies of The University of Georgia.

The Career Center does not provide career services to UGA faculty and/or staff members who are not graduates of The University of Georgia.

The principles presented here are designed to provide practitioners with three basic precepts for career planning, placement, and recruitment:

  • Maintain an open and free selection of employment opportunities in an atmosphere conducive to objective thought, where job candidates can choose optimum long-term uses of their talents that are consistent with personal objectives and all relevant facts;
  • Maintain a recruitment process that is fair and equitable to candidates and employing organizations;
  • Support informed and responsible decision making by candidates.

Adherence to the guidelines will support the collaborative effort of career planning, placement, and recruitment professionals while reducing the potential for abuses. The guidelines also apply to new technology or third-party recruiting relationships which may be substituted for the traditional personal interaction among career services professionals, employer professionals, and students/alumni.

These principles are not all-inclusive; they are intended to serve as a framework within which the career planning and recruitment processes should function, and as a foundation upon which professionalism can be promoted.

 

 

 

Student/Alumni Rights and Responsibilities as a Job Seeker
POLICY: 2
Effective Date: 06/24/2009
Last Updated: 04/22/2009

Student/Alumni Rights and Responsibilities as a Job Seeker

Choosing and attaining meaningful post-graduation employment is an important challenge for college students/alumni. To aid this process, your career center and employers develop connections and programs, such as on-campus recruiting, resume referral services, and job fairs, in which you and your fellow students/alumni are active participants. In order for this process to be successful, everyone involved must work together. These principles provide guidelines for that process in order to guarantee:

  • That students/alumni can openly, freely, and objectively select employment opportunities, making these choices based on their assessment of the best use of their abilities, their personal goals, and other pertinent facts;
  • A recruitment process that is fair and equitable to students/alumni and employers alike;
  • Support for informed and responsible decision making by students/alumni.

 

 

 

Students/Alumni: Here's What You Can Reasonably Expect From Your Career Center...
POLICY: 2.1
Effective Date: 06/24/2009
Last Updated: 04/22/2009

 

Students/Alumni:  Here's What You Can Reasonably Expect From Your Career Center...

1. Confidentiality.  Career Center staff members are expected to exercise sound judgment and fairness in maintaining the confidentiality of student information, regardless of the source, including written records, reports, and computer data bases. Disclosure of student information outside the college/university should only be made with your prior consent unless health and safety considerations necessitate the distribution of such information.

2. Freedom of choice.  You're entitled to be assisted by the Career Center staff in developing a career plan and making career decisions without having staff members' biases or personal values imposed upon you.

3. Access to all services and events.  Career centers may charge students/alumni for registering or taking part in certain services or events. Such fees should be sufficiently nominal so as not to hinder you from participating.

4. Access to career information.  All students/alumni, regardless of personal or educational background, should be provided by Career Center staff members with equal and full access to information on career opportunities and types of employing organizations. Career Center staff members are also expected to inform you how and where to obtain information which may influence your decisions about an employing organization.

5. Testing information.  Career Center staff members should inform you of the availability of testing, the purpose of the tests, and the disclosure policies regarding test results.

 

 

 

 

Students/Alumni: Here's What You Can Reasonably Expect From Employers...
POLICY: 2.2
Effective Date: 06/24/2009
Last Updated: 04/22/2009

 

Students/Alumni:  Here's What You Can Reasonably Expect From Employers

1. Confidentiality.  Employers are expected to maintain the confidentiality of student information, regardless of the source, including personal knowledge, written records/reports, and computer databases. An employer shouldn't disclose information about you to another organization without your prior written consent, unless necessitated by health and/or safety considerations.

2. Accurate information.  Employers are expected to provide accurate information about their organizations and employment opportunities. This includes, but is not limited to, positions available, responsibilities, career advancement opportunities, and benefits.

3. Freedom from undue pressure.  Employers are expected to provide you with a reasonable amount of time to make a decision about accepting an employment offer.  They are also expected to provide you with a reasonable process for making your decision. An unreasonable process, for example, is one in which the student is told that the offer is good for a set amount of time; unbeknownst to the student, the same offer has been made to others-and the student who accepts first gets the job. In addition, it is improper for employers to pressure you to revoke your acceptance of another job offer.

4. Timely communication.  Employers are expected to inform you of your status in the hiring process and communicate hiring decisions within the agreed-upon time frame.

5. Fair treatment.  If an employer is required by changing conditions to revoke a job offer that you've accepted, you're entitled to a fair and equitable course of action. That can include, but is not limited to, financial assistance and outplacement service.

6. Testing information.  Employers should inform you in advance of any testing, the purpose of the tests, and their policies regarding disclosure of test results.

7. Nondiscrimination.  Employers are expected to avoid discrimination in their recruitment activities and to follow equal employment opportunity and affirmative action principles.

 

 

 

 

Students/Alumni: Your Role in this Process...
POLICY: 2.3
Effective Date: 06/24/2009
Last Updated: 04/22/2009

Students/Alumni:  Your Role in this Process

1.  Assume ownership and responsibility for your career development and job search process.  The process of career development - from career exploration to the job search process - is a partnership in which you must take an active role.  Using your Career Center to find a job is like using your gym to get in shape.  You can't just snap your fingers and you're physically fit...you have to exercise- lift weights, run laps, and work out.  Likewise, you need to "work out" at your Career Center.  Your Career Center workout may consist of registering for DAWGlink, meeting with your Career Consultant, and attending programs on resume writing, networking, and the job search.  By partnering with the Career Center, you'll be able to enhance your career development skills and, ultimately, become more successful in your job search. 

2. Provide accurate information about your academic work and records, including courses taken, grades, positions held, and duties performed.  You can, however, refuse to provide an employer with specific information about any job offers you may have received from other employers. You do not have to name the organizations that have made you offers, nor do you have to provide specific information about what salaries you've discussed with those organizations. Instead, you can give broad responses to such questions, naming types of employers-"I've interviewed with employers in the retail industry"-and offering salary ranges rather than specific dollar amounts-"The salary offers I've received have been in the $25,000 to $30,000 range." Incidentally, it's in your best interest to research salaries and to let employers know that you have done so.

3. Be honest.  Conduct your job search with honesty and integrity. Do not lie or stretch the truth on your resume, applications, or during any part of the interview process.

4. Interview genuinely.  Interview only with employers you're sincerely interested in working for and whose eligibility requirements you meet. "Practice" interviewing is misleading to employers-wasting both their time and money-and prevents sincerely interested candidates from using those interview slots.

5. Adhere to schedules.  Appear for all interviews, on campus and elsewhere, unless unforeseeable events prevent you from doing so. And, if you can't make the interview because of an unforeseeable event, notify your career center and the employer at the earliest possible moment.

6. Don't keep employers hanging.  Communicate your acceptance or refusal of a job offer to employers as promptly as possible, so they can notify other candidates that they are still being considered or that the position is filled.

7. Accept a job offer in good faith.  When you accept an offer, you should have every intention of honoring that commitment. Accepting an offer only as a precautionary measure is misleading to the employer and may restrict opportunities for others who are genuinely interested in that employer.

8. Withdraw from recruiting when your job search is completed.  If you accept an offer or decide that full-time graduate or professional studies are for you, notify your career center and withdraw from the on-campus recruiting process immediately. And, let employers that are actively considering you for a job know that you are now out of the running.
     By informing everyone that you've got a job or are headed to graduate school, you not only get the chance to brag but also to help your friends who are trying to get on interview schedules or who are being considered for positions.

9. Claim fair reimbursement.  If an employer has agreed to reimburse you for expenses you incur in its recruitment process, your request should be only for reasonable and legitimate expenses.

10. Obtain the career information you need to make an informed choice about your future.  It's up to you to acquire the information about career opportunities, organizations, and any other information that might influence your decisions about an employing organization.

11.  Follow student event policy.  To help ensure a pleasant and productive environment for all participants, the following guidelines have been established:  1) Career Fairs are open to UGA students and alumni only.  2) Respect all participants (employers, job seekers, and staff).  3)  Appropriate attire is required and is determined by event.  Some events require Professional or Business Attire.  4) For safety reasons, the doorways to the event (inside and out) and the surrounding areas must be kept clear at all times.  5) Participants are expected to cooperate with all reasonable requests made by members of the staff and all reasonable requests of any person acting in an official capacity as a representative of the participating institutions.  6) If questions or concerns arise during the event, please contact a member of the Career Center staff for assistance.

12.  Follow the DAWGlink usage policy.  Access to DAWGlink is provided exclusively to currently enrolled UGA students and alumni. Individual account holders are prohibited from sharing their access to the system with other individuals (UGA or external).  UGA students or alumni who violate this policy are, at the discretion of the UGA Career Center, subject to lose their access to DAWGlink, including their interviewing privileges at the UGA Career Center. Other policy violations, such as not showing up for a scheduled campus interview and/or RSVP event, could lead students' to lose their access to DAWGlink

13.  Request accommodations if necessary - Career Center Disability Access Policy.  The Career Center is committed to providing access for all people with disabilities and will provide accommodations if notified in advance. To request accommodations please contact us at 706-542-3375.

14.  Be aware of fraudulent job postings - Career Center Fraudulent Jobs Policy.  The University of Georgia's (UGA) Career Center does not endorse any employer and urges students/alumni to use good judgment in all of their interactions with employers. The UGA Career Center suggests that students/alumni request business references for unknown organizations before interviewing with them off campus. The UGA Career Center advises students/alumni to interview in public places only. If you have any questions or concerns regarding the validity of an employer's job posting, interview practices, or any other interaction you may have with an employer please contact UGA's Career Center at 706-542-3375.  If you are actively seeking employment, don't fall for one of the many forms of employment scams.  See below tips on how to avoid employment scams and/or click here - http://www.career.uga.edu/multimedia/bbb.pdf - for additional information from The Better Business Bureau that can help educate you on how to protect yourself from fraudulent job postings or staffing agencies.  Typically, you can identify an employment scam because:  1) You must give your credit card or bank account numbers, or copies of personal documents - but you get nothing in writing.  2) You must send payment by wire service or courier.  3) You are offered a large payment or reward in exchange for allowing the use of your bank account - often for depositing checks or transferring money.  4) You receive an unexpectedly large check.

15.  Read, respond, and act on student e-mail notices - The UGA Career Center uses e-mail to notify students/alumni about newly posted positions, upcoming deadlines, or last minute changes to interview schedules. Employers will primarily use your email for notifications, so it's critical to check your e-mail on a regular basis!

16.  Monitor Your Online Identity.  Social networking profiles (i.e. Facebook, MySpace, Twitter) are public and can be viewed by employers.  Therefore, it is important for you to review your social networking profiles and delete anything questionable.  Edit anything that may be used for discrimination or may be viewed as inappropriate, controversial, or scandalous.  Google yourself or use multiple search engines to find out what employers might see when searching for your name, email address, screen name, and phone number.  If you find information you feel could be detrimental to your candidacy or career, see about getting it removed- and make sure you have an answer ready to counter or explain "digital dirt."

17.  Develop a professional e-mail address and voice mail message.  When corresponding with employers, it is important to present a professional image.  Email addresses such as BrewDawg@email.com or sassy@email.edu may have personal meaning to you, but to employers, they represent someone who lacks professionalism. Your telephone voice mail message should also reflect professionalism.  Make sure that the greeting has a businesslike tone.  Avoid having music playing in the background or using inappropriate language.

 

Employer Policy
POLICY: 3
Effective Date: 06/24/2009
Last Updated: 04/22/2009

The University of Georgia Career Center is dedicated to helping employers connect with students and alumni.  We serve as a corporate gateway to the university by helping employers understand the curriculum, meet key faculty and staff, and successfully recruit and hire our students and alumni.  The Center offers a team of professionals dedicated to facilitating your recruitment efforts and assisting you with strategy, visibility, employment data, and feedback loops.   

 

 

Employers: Here's What You Can Reasonably Expect From the Career Center...
POLICY: 3.1
Effective Date: 06/24/2009
Last Updated: 04/22/2009

 

1. Comparable services.  Career Center staff members will provide generally comparable services to all employers, regardless of whether the employers contribute services, gifts, or financial support to the educational institution or office and regardless of the level of such support.

2. Equal access to services.  Career Center staff members will establish reasonable and fair guidelines for access to services by employers. When guidelines permit access to organizations recruiting on behalf of an employer and to international employers, the following principles will apply:

a) Organizations providing recruiting services for a fee may be asked to inform career services of the specific employer they represent and the specific jobs for which they are recruiting. When deemed necessary, the Career Center can request contact information to verify that the organization is recruiting for a bona fide job opportunity. The Career Center must respect the confidentiality of this information and may not publish it in any manner. Third-party recruiters that charge fees to students/alumni will not be permitted access to the UGA Career Center's services;

b) Employers recruiting for work outside of the United States are expected to adhere to the equal employment opportunity (EEO) policy of the Career Center. They will advise the Career Center and the students/alumni of the realities of working in that country and of any cultural and foreign law differences.

3. Nondiscrimination.  The UGA Career Center will maintain EEO compliance and follow affirmative action principles in career services activities in a manner that includes the following:

a) Referring all interested students/alumni for employment opportunities without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, or disability, and providing reasonable accommodations upon request;

b) Notifying employing organizations of any selection procedures that appear to have an adverse impact based upon the student's race, color, national origin, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, or disability;

c) Assisting recruiters in accessing certain groups on campus to provide a more inclusive applicant pool;

d) Informing all students/alumni about employment opportunities, with particular emphasis on those employment opportunities in occupational areas where certain groups of students/alumni are underrepresented;

e) Developing awareness of, and sensitivity to, cultural differences and the diversity of students/alumni, and providing responsive services;

f) Responding to complaints of EEO noncompliance, working to resolve such complaints with the recruiter or employing organization, and, if necessary, consulting with the appropriate campus department.

4. Appropriately valued services.  If the charging of fees for career services becomes necessary, such fees will be appropriate to the budgetary needs of the office and will not hinder student/alumni or employer access to services. Career Center staff members are encouraged to counsel student and university organizations engaged in recruitment activities to follow this principle.

5. Fair and active application of principles.  Active Career Center staff members will also promote and encourage acceptance of these principles throughout their educational institution, particularly with faculty and staff who work directly with employers, and will respond to reports of noncompliance.

6.  Due diligence and appropriate action regarding complaints.  Upon receiving employer-related complaints from students/alumni, the Career Center will investigate on a case-by-case basis   Depending on the findings, The University of Georgia Career Center reserves the right to refuse service to any employer if a review of the specific opportunity or nature/status of the company suggests that it is inappropriate for our service population; if students/alumni are injured or exposed to unsafe working conditions; if the employer discriminates; or if The University of Georgia Career Center receives complaints from students/alumni about discrimination, harassment, threats, unsafe working conditions, or any other questionable circumstance.

 

 

 

 

 

Employers: Here's Your Role in the Process as it Relates to Career Services and Students/Alumni...
POLICY: 3.2
Effective Date: 06/24/2009
Last Updated: 04/22/2009

 

1. Freedom from undue pressure.  Employment professionals will refrain from any practice that improperly influences and affects job acceptances. Such practices may include undue time pressure for acceptance of employment offers and encouragement of revocation of another employment offer. Employment professionals will strive to communicate decisions to candidates within the agreed-upon time frame.

2. Know your audience.  Employment professionals will know the recruitment and career development field as well as the industry and the employing organization that they represent, and work within a framework of professionally accepted recruiting, interviewing, and selection techniques.

3. Provide accurate information.  Employment professionals will supply accurate information on their organization and employment opportunities. Employing organizations are responsible for information supplied and commitments made by their representatives. If conditions change and require the employing organization to revoke its commitment, the employing organization will pursue a course of action for the affected candidate that is fair and equitable.

4. Play fair.  Neither employment professionals nor their organizations will expect, or seek to extract, special favors or treatment which would influence the recruitment process as a result of support, or the level of support, to the educational institution or career services office in the form of contributed services, gifts, or other financial support.

5. Do not serve alcohol.  Serving alcohol should not be part of the recruitment process on or off campus. This includes receptions, dinners, company tours, etc.

6. Maintain nondiscrimination policy.  Employment professionals will maintain equal employment opportunity (EEO) compliance and follow affirmative action principles in recruiting activities in a manner that includes the following:

a) Recruiting, interviewing, and hiring individuals without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, or disability, and providing reasonable accommodations upon request;

b) Reviewing selection criteria for adverse impact based upon the student's race, color, national origin, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, or disability;

c) Avoiding use of inquiries that are considered unacceptable by EEO standards during the recruiting process;

d) Developing a sensitivity to, and awareness of, cultural differences and the diversity of the work force;

e) Informing campus constituencies of special activities that have been developed to achieve the employer's affirmative action goals;

f) Investigating complaints forwarded by the career services office regarding EEO noncompliance and seeking resolution of such complaints.

7. Maintain confidentiality.  Employment professionals will maintain the confidentiality of student information, regardless of the source, including personal knowledge, written records/reports, and computer databases. There will be no disclosure of student information to another organization without the prior written consent of the student, unless necessitated by health and/or safety considerations.

8.  Use assessment tools and tests appropriately.  Those engaged in administering, evaluating, and interpreting assessment tools, tests, and technology used in selection will be trained and qualified to do so. Employment professionals must advise the Career Center of any test conducted on campus and eliminate such a test if it violates campus policies. Employment professionals must advise students/alumni in a timely fashion of the type and purpose of any test that students/alumni will be required to take as part of the recruitment process and to whom the test results will be disclosed. All tests will be reviewed by the employing organization for disparate impact and job-relatedness.

9. Third-party recruiting agency policy.    If you are a third-party recruiter posting a job for a client, it will be necessary to disclose the client name for whom you are recruiting in the Job Description Box. All positions posted by third-party recruiters without the client name will be deleted from the system.  Third-party recruiters are eligible to participate in the Career Fair ONLY IF they are recruiting for their own respective organization OR they explicitly state the company they are representing at the time of the fair.  The recruiting complexities that exist for a third-party recruiter far surpass those of a typical employer.  Therefore, the UGA Career Center reserves the right to deny access and participation to any third-party employer. 

10.  Temporary agencies or staffing services.  Temporary agencies or staffing services are employers, not third-party recruiters, and will be expected to comply with the professional conduct principles set forth for employer professionals. These are organizations that contract to provide individuals qualified to perform specific tasks or complete specific projects for a client organization. Individuals perform work at the client organization, but are employed and paid by the agency.

11. Follow career center policy when working with external UGA departments.  When employment professionals conduct recruitment activities through student associations or academic departments, such activities will be conducted in accordance with the policies of the Career Center.

12. Follow EEO compliance.  Employment professionals will cooperate with the policies and procedures of the career services office, including certification of EEO compliance or exempt status under the Immigration Reform and Control Act, and will honor scheduling arrangements and recruitment commitments.

13. Inform students/alumni of cultural or legal differences.  Employment professionals recruiting for international operations will do so according to EEO standards. Employment professionals will advise the Career Center and students/alumni of the realities of working in that country and of any cultural or foreign law differences.

14. Fair and active application of principles. Employment professionals will educate and encourage acceptance of these principles throughout their employing institution and by third parties representing their employing organization on campus, and will respond to reports of noncompliance.

15.  Follow Career Fair registration policy.  The Career Center will be happy to refund your registration fee, if and only if, you cancel two (2) weeks or more prior to the Career Fair.  After the two (2) week deadline date, credit for future expos may be considered on a case by case basis by Career Center staff.  If you have not paid in full and cancel less than two (2) weeks prior to the event, you will be held responsible for payment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty/Staff
POLICY: 4
Effective Date: 02/23/2011
Last Updated: 04/22/2009

 

Faculty/Staff: Here's Your Role in the Process as it Relates to Career Services and Students/Alumni...

 

A Faculty Guide to Ethical and Legal Standards in Student Hiring

Students aren't the only one interested in their success; their accomplishments are also very important to the college. Staff members in career services, admissions, development, alumni relations, and you, the faculty, have a direct investment in their achievement. The role you play in the employment process complements the role played by career services. Occasionally, however, helping students in their job searches can result in unanticipated illegal or unethical actions.

 

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), the leading source of information on the employment of the college educated and an organization to which a great number of academic and hiring organizations belong, provides a set of ethical standards for guiding the job-search process. Titled Principles for Professional Practice for Career Services & Employment Professionals, these standards are based on notions of fairness, equal opportunity, truthfulness, non-injury, confidentiality, and lawfulness.

 

In its foreword, the Principles document notes that colleges and employers share the common goal of "achieving the best match between the individual student and the employing organization." The six essential precepts that serve as the foundation of this goal are:

1. All candidates should have equal access to the opportunity for open and free selection of employment opportunities consistent with their personal objectives and optimum use of their talents.

2. Both colleges and employers should support informed and responsible decision making by candidates.

3. All aspects of the recruiting process should be fair and equitable to candidates and employing organizations.

4. Career services professionals and faculty involved in recruiting should provide generally comparable services to all employers, regardless of whether the employers contribute services, gifts, or financial support to the college, department, or office, and regardless of the level of such support.

5. As required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), any disclosure of student information outside of the educational institution will be with prior consent of the student unless health and/or safety considerations necessitate the dissemination of such information. Both career services professionals and faculty will exercise sound judgment and fairness in maintaining the confidentiality of student information, regardless of the source, including written

records, reports, and computer data bases.

6. Any recruitment activities through student associations or academic departments should be conducted in accordance with the policies of the career services office and accepted ethical, equal employment and legal practices.

 

Because of the influence you have with both students seeking jobs and employers seeking new talent, this guide was created to assist you.

 

GUIDELINES

A. Candidate Referral

We must maintain an environment of equal employment opportunity and act in a fair and nondiscriminatory manner without regard of a student's race, color, gender, religious belief, color, national origin, disability, veteran status, or any other factor beyond bona fide occupational qualifications that may exclude a student from consideration for a position for which she/he is qualified.

 

Employers may contact you to request the names of students who would be good candidates for job opportunities. At first glance, it seems harmless to provide the names of your best students.  However, there are some potential legal and ethical pitfalls. If you or a colleague receive a job lead from an employer and choose only to refer a few individuals without publicizing the position to all students who may be qualified, you are not maintaining "a fair and equitable recruiting process." Choosing to refer only a select group of students without providing an opportunity to all students may expose you to scrutiny.

 

By identifying individuals for employment on a "regular" basis, you may be considered an "employment agency" for purposes of compliance with equal employment opportunity laws. For example, if it appears as if you are referring only male students or only minority students, you may be open to charges of discrimination.

 

Employers who act in accordance with the Principles understand and expect students to receive open and equal access to information about job opportunities.

 

Suggested action: If you receive a request for student referrals, you can, of course, notify students who have declared an interest in such positions and encourage them to apply. You may also consider announcing the opportunity to your classes or distribute the job description via a listserv. However, for your protection, as well as that of the college, the initial request from the employer should be sent to the college career center so that the position can be posted openly for

all qualified candidates.

 

There are practical reasons for these actions:

a. You may not know or remember the names of all students who could be interested in such a position. When you provide only a few names without also broadly publicizing the position through the career services office, you are not maintaining "a fair and equitable recruiting process" and are vulnerable to charges of discrimination. 

b. If an employer asks for the name of the top student in a class you taught, remember that there is a difference between providing the names of students who excelled in a job-related class and restricting awareness of an opportunity to just a few. Every qualified candidate interested in the opportunity should be able to apply; it is the employer's responsibility to decide who would be the best fit for the bona fide qualifications.

c. The career services office may have an existing relationship with the requesting employer or the specific individual who contacted you, or may wish to expand its relationship to enhance student opportunities. By contacting the career services office, you can facilitate appropriate follow-up and help develop future prospects.

d. As you may be aware, employers have received attention in the past for recruiting, employment, or on-the-job safety practices that do not necessarily meet the college's standards. Interaction and potential placement of students in such an environment poses a high potential for inappropriate student exposure and the possibility of public scrutiny.

e. Confusion or misunderstandings may occur when an employer works with more than one campus office on the same issue and serves to undermine the focus on securing students with viable employment.

f. It is convenient to both employers and students to have a central, consistent resource for job opportunities (a viable career services office) that publicizes open jobs to multiple majors.

g. Students who receive regular announcements about job openings from faculty may think the announcements represent all of the current opportunities for their major. Students may miss employers that conduct on-campus interviews, receive resume referrals, and post their positions through the career services office. Students who don't use the expertise of the specialists in the career services office also miss opportunities for assistance with resumes, interviewing, and other job-search issues.

 

B. Referring Minority Candidates:

Employers seek a diverse work force and have diversity and affirmative objectives in their college relations programs. Accordingly, they will make special efforts to identify and attract all qualified candidates. You may be asked for help in accomplishing tasks associated with minority recruiting efforts.

 

The NACE Principles document endorses compliance with EEO guidelines and adherence to affirmative action principles by both college and staffing professionals. It is illegal to discriminate against protected groups, and it is considered appropriate for career services practitioners to inform members of protected groups about employment opportunities, especially in areas where minorities are underrepresented.

 

Similarly, employers are encouraged to inform minority populations of special activities, e.g., information sessions or career fairs that have been developed to help achieve an employer's affirmative action goals. You can participate in all of these activities.

 

While it is lawful and ethical for you to assist employers in reaching out to minority groups, it is inappropriate for you to identify only those individuals you know to be members of a specific group. You have an obligation to provide a "fair" and open and inclusive system, i.e., one where all students have access to information about career opportunities.

 

Suggested Action: If you receive a request for minority candidate referrals, you can make announcements in class, post signs in your department, notify minority student organizations (e.g., societies of black, female, or Hispanic engineers, or GLBT organizations), but you should also send the request on to the career services office. Also, you should encourage the employer to contact the career center directly. You can also refer the employer to career services directly to

provide as broad an effort as possible and refer the employer to your college's minority student advisory office (if one exists). That office may be authorized to provide a full list of the members of a requested population.

 

C. Providing References

If you are asked by an employer to provide a reference for a student, be aware that you must have prior written authorization from the student to provide information, or the employer must have such authorization from the student. Once permission has been obtained, you should provide information that is based on facts, not conjecture, and not on personal information unrelated to the student's qualifications for the job in question. You must always safeguard

students' right to privacy.

 

Suggested Action: When you are asked to provide a written or verbal reference for a student, obtain written permission from the student or a copy of such permission from the employer. All reference information should be based on firsthand knowledge and, if possible, written factual documentation. When providing information, you should avoid personal matters and areas that would fall outside of bona fide job requirements (e.g., marital status, health, disabilities, race,

religion, and more).

 

D. Advising a Student Organization

 

If you are involved in an advisory capacity or faculty/staff leader to a student organization, you have a responsibility to inform and educate the student organization of The University of Georgia's recruiting policies as defined by the Career Center.  This is especially true for those student organizations who frequently interact with and/or invite employers to speak at their organizational meetings. 

 

Suggested Action:

At the beginning of each academic year, ensure that the student organization's leadership is familiar with The University of Georgia's recruiting policies.  It is important to note that any jobs being shared with the student organization, either in person or via email, should be made available to the entire membership of said student organization.  In addition, for your protection, as well as that of the college, any job positions made available to the student organization should be sent to the college career center so that the position can be posted openly for all qualified candidates.  Share The University of Georgia employer policy entitled, "Employers:  Here's Your Role in the Process as it Relates to Career Services and Students/Alumni" with all of your employer guest speakers.  

 

 

FINAL COMMENTS

Your students' success is best realized when all parties involved in the process work cooperatively, ethically, and within the guidelines established by The University of Georgia Career Center. In cases of uncertainty relative to the rights of students and practices that may subject the college to legal scrutiny, contact UGA Career Center for information and direction.

 

You and your colleagues on the faculty are encouraged to offer comments to UGA Career Services practitioners regarding these guidelines and the issues addressed. We appreciate your assistance in assuring an employment process that is free from discrimination and provides equal opportunities to all qualified students.

 

Parents
POLICY: 5
Effective Date: 06/24/2009
Last Updated: 04/22/2009

 

The UGA Career Center is pleased to answer career-related questions from parents of UGA students and alumni.  However, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) restricts our office from releasing any information from a student's education record to parents without written permission from students/alumni.